New Trees, Wildflowers and Decorative Landscaping Highlight Completed Clean California Projects in San Fernando Valley Along Interstate 5 and State Route 118 Interchange

 

LOS ANGELES – May 9, 2024 Caltrans announced the successful completion of two Clean California-funded projects in the communities of Sun Valley, Pacoima, and San Fernando. The $4.5 million I-5 and SR-118 Interchange Beautification and the $5.7 million I-5 East Valley Beautification Projects have significantly improved aesthetic appeal and addressed community concerns by repairing broken fences and removing litter and large debris from multiple locations.

Landscaping

I-5 and SR-118 Interchange Beautification Project

The $4.5 million project in the under-served communities of San Fernando and Pacoima has transformed the appearance of this interchange and roadside from Sepulveda to Glen Oaks Boulevards by upgrading irrigation systems to wilting plants and shrubbery and stabilizing eroded soil areas with rock blankets and wildflower hydroseeding.

Additionally, attractive stamped concrete, new wood mulch, decorative boulders, upgraded fencing, and new trees (Octopus Agave, Blue Flame Agave, Eucalyptus Camaldulensis, and other native plants) were incorporated at the westbound 118 onramp to the southbound 405 connector.

Interstate 5 East Valley Beautification Project

The $5.7 million project enhanced interchanges at Roscoe, Sunland, Lankershim, Laurel Canyon and Van Nuys Boulevards, as well as those located on Penrose, Tuxford Sheldon, Branford, Osbourne, Terra Bella, and Paxton Streets. The project also installed wall fencing, irrigation systems, rock blanket, colorful stamped concrete, and beautiful native plants. Rock blankets provide a ground cover surface made of cobbled stone that is aesthetically pleasing and aids in erosion control, prevention of storm water pollution, and weed suppression.

“Restoring beauty to shared public spaces and reinvigorating community spirit represent the essence of Clean California,” said Caltrans Director Tony Tavares. “Residents and visitors alike can now experience this section of the San Fernando Valley with more appreciation for a transportation system that is functional and visually appealing.”

“These projects reenergize several underserved communities by enhancing neighborhood pride and creating a more beautiful place to live,” said Gloria Roberts, Caltrans District 7 Director. “The improved visual aesthetics, prevention of unsafe access to freeways, and reduction of litter and graffiti have reclaimed these areas and helped promote civic engagement, social connections, and a sense of belonging.”

Since launching Clean California in July 2021, Caltrans and its local partners have picked up more than 2.3 million cubic yards of litter – enough to fill about 700 Olympic-size swimming pools. This represents a substantial increase compared to the department’s previous trash collection efforts and can largely be attributed to Clean California, along with other Caltrans litter removal efforts. Caltrans has hosted more than 500 free dump days in communities throughout the state – resulting in the collection of 12,000-plus mattresses and nearly 50,000 tires. The initiative has drawn more than 10,000 community clean-up volunteers and created 15,000 jobs, including positions for individuals who were formerly incarcerated, on probation, or experiencing housing insecurity.